Why are art museums intimidating

24-Oct-2019 12:30

The original wing of the museum was designed by architect John Volk.

According to Volk, “a museum should give a feeling of permanence and that is what I have tried to do with this building.” But this museum is not intimidating, it welcomes you inside both its exhibition galleries and intimate gardens and encourages you to stay.

SHANGHAI – How to tackle the ever more pressing issues of social and environmental sustainability from a perspective that makes them understandable not just to a small intellectual elite but also to the public?

For Hong Kong and Madrid-based Collective Studio, the answer is an interdisciplinary, immersive museum experience that is free and open to all.

The Kimbell stela was once part of a sculptural ensemble of three stelae displayed in a plaza at El Perú.

The central monument, now in the Cleveland Museum of Art, represents on the same scale an equally intimidating woman, who may represent K’inich B’alam’s wife.

It's really rare for me to chat with other visitors ...

and yesterday's experience encouraged me to step outside the box, and return to [being] a "child" in a grand (sometimes intimidating) museum place.

I love the philosophy behind it: as sometimes, we might attempt to embellish or upgrade ourselves through art, and this act might make our encounter with art very utilitarian and practical.

The studio came up with a sequence of displays in an immersive design that offered new contextual narratives for understanding the exhibition’s core theme.

Through three zones, Collective organized points of contact between the different spheres of knowledge, emphasizing both the making and exhibiting of the works of art.

It's really rare for me to chat with other visitors ...

and yesterday's experience encouraged me to step outside the box, and return to [being] a "child" in a grand (sometimes intimidating) museum place.

I love the philosophy behind it: as sometimes, we might attempt to embellish or upgrade ourselves through art, and this act might make our encounter with art very utilitarian and practical.

The studio came up with a sequence of displays in an immersive design that offered new contextual narratives for understanding the exhibition’s core theme.

Through three zones, Collective organized points of contact between the different spheres of knowledge, emphasizing both the making and exhibiting of the works of art.

The Carpet strategically touched as many exhibits as possible, symbolizing interdisciplinary continuity and the shared paths of participants and researchers.