Steve jobs apple backdating

23-Jun-2020 09:00

It’s hard to understand why the head of such an enormous company would be so upset about Gizmodo writing a story about his lost i Phone.

What do you think his fans will think of the movie?

It basically involves faking documentation and lying to investors.

Although backdating is unlawful, it was common practice in Silicon Valley for a long time — until a 2006 , but it decided to hire a special legal committee to do an in-house investigation on its own situation.

By 2008, dozens of top executives from Altera, Broadcom, Brocade, Cirrus Logic, KLA-Tencor, Mc Afee, Take Two, Verisign more than a dozen other technology companies had lost their jobs over the fallout. In 2006, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) investigated two large backdated option grants: one for 4.8 million shares to the company’s executive team and another for 7.5 million shares to Jobs, who was CEO at the time.

being brought against two top executives, both of whom had benefitted directly from the backdated options.

He’s not broke, mind you; just using the court system to stiff creditors for million.

Although Steve’s “Second Coming” (to use biographer Alan Deutschman’s words) is regarded as one of the most spectacular success stories in the history of business, recent years have not been all that rosy for the i CEO.

Backdating is an illegal accounting process consisting of picking a date in the past, when a stock's value was lower, to assign the exercise price of options.

Gibney certainly takes an unusual approach: Rather than a straightforward life story, the movie focuses on a handful of moments in Jobs’s life that many biographies don’t linger on, like Apple’s stock options backdating scandal. https://youtu.be/lzyq1t-Sjc M I sat in on a group Q&A session with Gibney at SXSW in March. But also at the same time, I’m appalled, really, by his cruelty, and his inability to get outside himself, and to see himself and his company in a broader perspective. But not because they were telling incidents about Apple the business.

That allows Gibney to play rare — and fascinating — footage of Jobs parrying with Securities and Exchange Commission lawyers during a 2008 deposition. Here’s an excerpt of that conversation: Your film doesn’t have any on-camera interviews with current Apple employees, or anyone who didn’t end up distanced from Jobs in some significant way. In that SEC deposition, where he’s talking about how, when he wasn’t given a bigger stock option package by the board, he felt hurt — that just struck me like, you’re a very very powerful guy, and the board didn’t do what you wanted to do by themselves, and you’re hurt? That seemed like a person who couldn’t get outside himself. Is that because you thought they were telling, or because you could talk to people who would talk about it, or both? This film really looks very carefully at his values.

He’s not broke, mind you; just using the court system to stiff creditors for million.

Although Steve’s “Second Coming” (to use biographer Alan Deutschman’s words) is regarded as one of the most spectacular success stories in the history of business, recent years have not been all that rosy for the i CEO.

Backdating is an illegal accounting process consisting of picking a date in the past, when a stock's value was lower, to assign the exercise price of options.

Gibney certainly takes an unusual approach: Rather than a straightforward life story, the movie focuses on a handful of moments in Jobs’s life that many biographies don’t linger on, like Apple’s stock options backdating scandal. https://youtu.be/lzyq1t-Sjc M I sat in on a group Q&A session with Gibney at SXSW in March. But also at the same time, I’m appalled, really, by his cruelty, and his inability to get outside himself, and to see himself and his company in a broader perspective. But not because they were telling incidents about Apple the business.

That allows Gibney to play rare — and fascinating — footage of Jobs parrying with Securities and Exchange Commission lawyers during a 2008 deposition. Here’s an excerpt of that conversation: Your film doesn’t have any on-camera interviews with current Apple employees, or anyone who didn’t end up distanced from Jobs in some significant way. In that SEC deposition, where he’s talking about how, when he wasn’t given a bigger stock option package by the board, he felt hurt — that just struck me like, you’re a very very powerful guy, and the board didn’t do what you wanted to do by themselves, and you’re hurt? That seemed like a person who couldn’t get outside himself. Is that because you thought they were telling, or because you could talk to people who would talk about it, or both? This film really looks very carefully at his values.

They are completely out of character for Apple," said Steve Jobs, Apple's CEO.