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05-Jun-2020 19:31

Another example: Kumail’s older and more dutiful brother (Adeel Akhtar) wants to know — in a way that seems right and reasonable — when Kumail is going to follow his example as a devout son and white-collar success story who can make the family proud.All of the thoughtful characters missing from the last 10 comedies you’ve seen? And we haven’t even gotten to the love story, marked by Kumail’s dithering.She is eager to quash the idea that age kills passion or friskiness.'Luckily, Marty thinks I've still got a beautiful body, even though it is old, and every now and again I take all of my clothes off in front of him and shake my (breasts) at him, and he loves it,' Jones writes in her autobiography.She describes herself as a rebellious tomboy, 'wild, willful and independent,' who became obsessed with movies and their stars but intended to turn her love of animals into a career as a veterinarian. In 1953, on a post-high school graduation trip to New York with her parents, a friend introduced her to an agent who, immediately impressed, told her to attend an open audition with John Fearnley, the casting director for the songwriting team of Rodgers and Hammerstein.In fact, the writer’s most famous character, Rip Van Winkle, set off on his mysterious day trip not far from this spot. For a smart woman who decided not to go to college, her curiosity seems boundless. There’s also a quirkiness there that perhaps emphasizes a quirk or two within, like Seyfried’s penchant for taxidermy or her need to Face Time with her Australian shepherd, Finn, whenever they’re apart for any length of time. Whether it’s placebo or not, I don’t want to risk it. Knowing that a lot of my fears are not reality-based really helps.”In case it isn’t obvious, Seyfried doesn’t censor herself. The two met in 2015 and started dating earlier this year. “My favorite thing now is because of this [local place] Lekker.When you hear thunder in the distance, it’s hard not to think of it being, as Irving imagined, made by the ghosts of Henry Hudson and his loyal men, those poor lost souls playing ninepins in the mountains. Night Shyamalan would be comfortable here; it’s a landscape of supernatural legends. Like many actresses, she is that familiar combination of autodidact and blank slate. She acknowledges that they are “weird” (and most likely inherited: “You should see my dad’s”). Now that the pickle lady has (finally) departed, I ask Seyfried a little more about her life up here with Finn and her growing menagerie of animals, both living and stuffed. Of course it is fashionable, and downright offensive, to claim you have OCD when you’re just a little high-strung. She is perfectly fine displaying vulnerability, even as a digital recorder is running right next to her lunch plate. They have this deep-dish Dutch apple pie that I saw last year and thought, I’ve got to make that. I make the basic Epicurious pie shell, and then you dump it double-full of apples or peaches.That includes Cassidy's impressive endowment, Jones' own 'highly sexed' nature that made orgasms a breeze, their threesome with another woman ('yuck,' she says, when asked about the onetime experiment), Cassidy's pre-marital sexual encounter with Cole Porter that Jones says left her unfazed, and her apparent tolerance for his infidelities.

The story is all over the place, and is way too messy to be anything but true.

On the pages there is recounting of her early life and dazzling career that included working with two musical theater masters, Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein, as well as many of Hollywood's top actors, including Marlon Brando, Jimmy Stewart and Richard Widmark.

But a substantial part of the book is spent on her troubled marriage to the late Jack Cassidy, the glossily handsome actor and singer whom she describes in a passage as her first lover and 'sexual Svengali,' and whose lessons she shares candidly.

It’s a warm, bighearted epic of assimilation, the latest iteration of a classic American story of immigrant striving — this time about a Pakistani American (Kumail Nanjiani) who feels what newly minted Americans have always felt: the pull of freedom and possibility, the thrill of being unbound by tradition.

In Nanjiani’s case, it means constructing a life (sometimes secretly) that’s in conflict with the wishes of his devout Muslim and aspirational parents (Anupam Kher, Zenobia Shroff).

The story is all over the place, and is way too messy to be anything but true.

On the pages there is recounting of her early life and dazzling career that included working with two musical theater masters, Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein, as well as many of Hollywood's top actors, including Marlon Brando, Jimmy Stewart and Richard Widmark.

But a substantial part of the book is spent on her troubled marriage to the late Jack Cassidy, the glossily handsome actor and singer whom she describes in a passage as her first lover and 'sexual Svengali,' and whose lessons she shares candidly.

It’s a warm, bighearted epic of assimilation, the latest iteration of a classic American story of immigrant striving — this time about a Pakistani American (Kumail Nanjiani) who feels what newly minted Americans have always felt: the pull of freedom and possibility, the thrill of being unbound by tradition.

In Nanjiani’s case, it means constructing a life (sometimes secretly) that’s in conflict with the wishes of his devout Muslim and aspirational parents (Anupam Kher, Zenobia Shroff).

Nanjiani wrote it with Gordon — now his wife — and made it with producer Judd Apatow, whose movies are known for being long and cluttered and discursive. Its wide embrace of subplots and characters is in tune with its big-tent themes. In a stock comedy they’d be stiff caricatures, punch lines crafted to reinforce the trite True Love formula and Old World/New World clichés.