Internet dating euphemisms

20-Jun-2020 06:27

Anyway, this friend has a lot going for her – smarts, looks, kindness – but is a fairly shy person initially who doesn’t get into the club or bar scene, and therefore her options for meeting someone in ‘real life’ are somewhat limited.

She works in a female-dominated industry and has a nice but small circle of friends that she’s unlikely to meet anyone through.

It showed a massive, wall-sized computer, with hundreds of blinking lights, ejecting a tiny paper card with a red heart on it for its operator, who was dwarfed by the computer’s hulking form.

The drawing of the computer was supposedly based on the huge SSEC (Selective Sequence Electronic Calculator) mainframe that IBM had shown off in its Madison Avenue showroom in New York City from 1948-1952.

What I've found through almost a decade of digital perusal is that everything we say (or don't say) in our profiles provides quite the detailed glimpse into the kind of person we are.

We may not know this as we write it, but our dating profiles reveal much more about us than we first expect.

Needless to say, I definitely know how difficult it is to navigate the very competitive landscape that online dating can be.

I realise my coupled-up status probably makes it easier for me to recommend to someone else, but I’m certain that I’d be up for trying it if I happened to be single.

My thinking is that we already live so much of our lives online (keeping in touch with friends, shopping, reading news, paying bills…) why not date, too?

The article connects this history to other examples in the history of technology that show how technological systems touted as “revolutionary” often help entrenched structural biases proliferate rather than breaking them down.

The article also upsets the notion that computer dating systems can simply be understood as a version of the “boys and their toys” narrative that has dominated much of computing history.

Needless to say, I definitely know how difficult it is to navigate the very competitive landscape that online dating can be.I realise my coupled-up status probably makes it easier for me to recommend to someone else, but I’m certain that I’d be up for trying it if I happened to be single.My thinking is that we already live so much of our lives online (keeping in touch with friends, shopping, reading news, paying bills…) why not date, too?The article connects this history to other examples in the history of technology that show how technological systems touted as “revolutionary” often help entrenched structural biases proliferate rather than breaking them down.The article also upsets the notion that computer dating systems can simply be understood as a version of the “boys and their toys” narrative that has dominated much of computing history.Rather than focusing on appearance, they believe “the senior population appears to be more interested in honest self-representation and being compatible rather than discussing areas such as sexual prowess and nightlife.” They use terms such as “young at heart” and “active” as euphemisms for fitness and good health.