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22-Dec-2019 17:34

died 30 years ago tonight on the rainy fall evening of October 23.

I’ll be wearing one of her amethyst birthstone rings – a gift from her sister, Lori, whose website celebrates Savitch’s legacy as a a groundbreaking TV news star of the 1970s and ’80s.

The Report and Transactions 1890-91 contains an Obituary by Ernest D.

Marquand which details the life of John Ralfs and is reprinted here.

Creeds and schools in abeyance, Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten, I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard, Nature without check with original energy.

Ralfs passed the last quarter of his life in repose and quietness occupying himself, as far as his health would permit, solely with work after his own heart; that is to say, first and foremost - the Penzance Public Library, which was unto him as a pet child; and, secondly, the compilation of an exhaustive Flora of West Cornwall, which unhappily he was not spared to complete.

Simple in his tastes, peaceful in disposition, tender-hearted and generous, always ready to lend a helping hand in any deserving cause, passionately fond of children, the shyest of whom made friends with him at first sight - he endeared himself to all by the genuine honesty of his character; his occasional taciturnity in the presence of strangers was simply due to an innate modesty and diffidence which even advancing age could not conquer.

John Ralfs, last July, must have come as a surprise; for he belonged to a generation of men who had reached the zenith of their fame at the middle of the century, and most of these have long since passed away.

The book which made his name famous throughout the botanical world, and by which he will be best remembered by the students of the future, was published forty-two years ago.

Creeds and schools in abeyance, Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten, I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard, Nature without check with original energy.

Ralfs passed the last quarter of his life in repose and quietness occupying himself, as far as his health would permit, solely with work after his own heart; that is to say, first and foremost - the Penzance Public Library, which was unto him as a pet child; and, secondly, the compilation of an exhaustive Flora of West Cornwall, which unhappily he was not spared to complete.

Simple in his tastes, peaceful in disposition, tender-hearted and generous, always ready to lend a helping hand in any deserving cause, passionately fond of children, the shyest of whom made friends with him at first sight - he endeared himself to all by the genuine honesty of his character; his occasional taciturnity in the presence of strangers was simply due to an innate modesty and diffidence which even advancing age could not conquer.

John Ralfs, last July, must have come as a surprise; for he belonged to a generation of men who had reached the zenith of their fame at the middle of the century, and most of these have long since passed away.

The book which made his name famous throughout the botanical world, and by which he will be best remembered by the students of the future, was published forty-two years ago.

A true pioneer in broadcasting, Savitch fought gender discrimination to land news-anchor jobs in Houston and Philadelphia.