Discrepancies in the radiocarbon dating area of the turin shroud

28-Feb-2020 08:44

The Shroud has attracted widespread interest ever since Secondo Pia took the first photograph of it in 1898: about whether it is Jesus' purported burial cloth, how old it might be, and how the image was created.According to radiocarbon dating done in 1988, the cloth was only 728 years old at the time.(Phys.org) —An earthquake in Old Jerusalem might be behind the famous image of the Shroud of Turin, says a group of researchers led by Alberto Carpinteri of the Politecnico di Torino in Italy in an article published in Springer's journal Meccanica.They believe that neutron radiation caused by an earthquake could have induced the image of a crucified man – which many people believe to be that of Jesus – onto the length of linen cloth, and caused carbon-14 dating done on it in 1988 to be wrong.Now Carpinteri's team, through mechanical and chemical experimentation, hypothesizes that high-frequency pressure waves generated in the Earth's crust during earthquakes are the source of such neutron emissions.

Specifically it is found in lignin, a complex chemical part of the secondary cell walls of the flax fibers.

He concluded that the sample used for carbon dating was not representative of the cloth. Moreover, one of the chemical differences, the amount of vanillin, provided a new clue about the cloth’s age.

Samples from the main part of the cloth, unlike the carbon 14 sample area, did not contain any vanillin. After a lengthy peer review process, his findings that the carbon dating was wholly invalid were published in the scientific journal Rogers' published work showing that the carbon dating is invalid has been confirmed by John L Brown, a forensic materials specialist at Georgia Tech in Atlanta, Georgia and by Robert Villarreal and a team of nine scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico.

It is chemically distinctly different in composition from blood but readily detected and identified microscopically by microchemical staining reactions.

Forensic tests for blood were uniformly negative on fibers from the blood-image tapes.

Specifically it is found in lignin, a complex chemical part of the secondary cell walls of the flax fibers.

He concluded that the sample used for carbon dating was not representative of the cloth. Moreover, one of the chemical differences, the amount of vanillin, provided a new clue about the cloth’s age.

Samples from the main part of the cloth, unlike the carbon 14 sample area, did not contain any vanillin. After a lengthy peer review process, his findings that the carbon dating was wholly invalid were published in the scientific journal Rogers' published work showing that the carbon dating is invalid has been confirmed by John L Brown, a forensic materials specialist at Georgia Tech in Atlanta, Georgia and by Robert Villarreal and a team of nine scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico.

It is chemically distinctly different in composition from blood but readily detected and identified microscopically by microchemical staining reactions.

Forensic tests for blood were uniformly negative on fibers from the blood-image tapes.

Thus if a piece of linen cloth has no remaining vanillin, and it has not been subjected to excessive temperatures for a significant amount of time, we can be quite sure it is at least 1300 years old.