Dating site passwords stolen benesova melzer dating

23-Sep-2019 04:27

A hacker claims to be selling tens of millions of user accounts for adult dating site on the dark web, including information on sexual desires, preferences, and other personal details.

“Find sex by contacting fellow Fling members and get laid tonight,” the site reads.

An intrusion at online dating service Cupid Media earlier this year exposed more than 42 million consumer records, including names, email addresses, unencrypted passwords and birthdays, according to information obtained by Krebs On Security.

The data stolen from Southport, Australia-based niche dating service Cupid Media was found on the same server where hackers had amassed tens of millions of records stolen from Adobe, PR Newswire and the National White Collar Crime Center (NW3C), among others. Six days later, I heard back from Andrew Bolton, the company’s managing director.

The purloined database contains more than 42 million entries in the format shown in the redacted image below. Bolton said the information appears to be related to a breach that occurred in January 2013.

“In January we detected suspicious activity on our network and based upon the information that we had available at the time, we took what we believed to be appropriate actions to notify affected customers and reset passwords for a particular group of user accounts,” Bolton said.

The company’s Web site and Twitter feed state that Cupid Media has more than 30 million customers around the globe.

Unfortunately, many companies have a habit of storing data on customers who are no longer active.

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Sending out passwords in plain text has been my chief complaint to them for several months now. If I forget my password, then perhaps something should be put in motion to reset it, but there is no reason for it to ever be sent in email. Was Plenty Of Fish actually hacked, as the site's owner is claiming?The website's login page has had an error active for weeks, Ars Technica reports.It's because the login page doesn't use HTTPS encryption to keep its users safe, Ars Technica explains.Slightly more sophisticated: 40,000 chose: “qwerty” as their password.(Look at your keyboard; it’s the first five letters of the left side of your keyboard – and you thought you were the only one doing that!

Sending out passwords in plain text has been my chief complaint to them for several months now. If I forget my password, then perhaps something should be put in motion to reset it, but there is no reason for it to ever be sent in email. Was Plenty Of Fish actually hacked, as the site's owner is claiming?The website's login page has had an error active for weeks, Ars Technica reports.It's because the login page doesn't use HTTPS encryption to keep its users safe, Ars Technica explains.Slightly more sophisticated: 40,000 chose: “qwerty” as their password.(Look at your keyboard; it’s the first five letters of the left side of your keyboard – and you thought you were the only one doing that!Did they detect the breach in 2011, and did they ever notify anyone about it?