Dating colonial pipes

04-Apr-2020 11:17

Few makers incorporated dates into their marks, though the practice of marking pipes probably initially coincided with the establishment of the London tobacco pipe guild in 1619 and continued into the 19th century (Nol Hume 2003-4). Archaeologists analyze multiple clues to date and identify the pipe maker including a careful combination of archaeological site context, bowl style and form, pipe stem bore diameter, style and placement of the mark itself, and place of manufacture. When using bowl typologies, we also acknowledge Nol Humes caveat (194) that we suspect remains as valid today as it was 45 years ago: There is, unfortunately, a great deal that we do not yet know about the so-called evolution of bowls and stems, and there is reason to suspect that present stylistic and dating criteria have been oversimplified. For example: Atkinson, David and Adrian Oswald 1980 The Dating and Typology of Clay Pipes Bearing the Royal Arms. Tobacco pipe makers marks appear in a variety of locations on the bowl including on the back, front, and sides, on the base, and on the sides of the spur or heel. Marks were produced by molds that left incuse (negative) or relief (raised) impressions (Oswald 19-91). A mold seam is present indicating that this piece comes from the back of the bowl (closest to the stem). Decorative molded pipe bowls like these became common after 1730 and were evolving into more elaborate forms after 1820. Though less likely, the steepness of the rear wall suggests that it might also be of several other types (10-14) that were in use between 17.

Archaeologists utilize pipe stems as a tool for dating historic sites by using modern drill bits in gradient measurements of 1/64-inch widths to measure the diameter of the pipe’s bore, and recording the frequency with which the different measurements occur.Through the 17th and 18th centuries, tobacco prices fell, and the shape of pipes changed in response.The stem became longer, the bowl larger, and the diameter of the bore grew progressively smaller.They might have been acquired either from the French who landed at A’asu in 1797, or they might have been obtained from itinerant whalers, who were known to frequent the coast prior to extensive contact with European missionaries after 1840. The Art and Archaeology of Clay Tobacco Pipes, Release A (CD-ROM). In either case, this artifact is the earliest known physical evidence for European contact in Samoa.

Archaeologists utilize pipe stems as a tool for dating historic sites by using modern drill bits in gradient measurements of 1/64-inch widths to measure the diameter of the pipe’s bore, and recording the frequency with which the different measurements occur.

Through the 17th and 18th centuries, tobacco prices fell, and the shape of pipes changed in response.

The stem became longer, the bowl larger, and the diameter of the bore grew progressively smaller.

They might have been acquired either from the French who landed at A’asu in 1797, or they might have been obtained from itinerant whalers, who were known to frequent the coast prior to extensive contact with European missionaries after 1840. The Art and Archaeology of Clay Tobacco Pipes, Release A (CD-ROM).

In either case, this artifact is the earliest known physical evidence for European contact in Samoa.

Those inventive people decided they could make smoking devices for their personal use, which they did, and later made more to send back to the New World for trade and to sell. There is much unknown information about just when and where the first clay smoking pipes were molded in Europe and in America.