Colonial dating and courtship

27-Jan-2020 07:00

Looks at the conflicts and issues within nursing such as resistance to professionalization, standards of control and pay, and work relations that reflected social relations in the larger society. Sympathy & Science: Women Physicians in American Medicine. Explores the history of American women in medicine from colonial beginnings as healers and midwives to twentieth-century challenges to "masculine" styles of practicing medicine. A Midwife's Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard, Based on Her Diary, 1785-1812. Uses a sharp eye and many documents to unravel meanings hidden in the seemingly mundane dailiness of a Maine midwife's diary entries.

Highlights the female pioneers and the changes accompanying the movement of women into professionalized medicine.

Many entries that students could compare with Martha Ballard's diary.]Schlereth, Thomas J. Ranges from the fifteenth to the nineteenth centuries, with much biographical information about European and American man-midwives. The History of the Health Care Sciences and Health Care, 1700-1980: A Selective Annotated Bibliography. Part of the Smithsonian Institution's series Bibliographies of the History of Science and Technology. Predates much recent, significant work on midwifery. The King's Midwife: A History and Mystery of Madame du Coudray. An as-told-to narrative of a "granny," an African-American lay-midwife's work in the twentieth century.

Although the word teenager did not come into use until decades later, the teenage mindset dawned in the 1920s.

Although child labor practices still existed, more and more states were passing restrictions against such exploitation.

The average number of years spent in school for young Americans was also on the rise.

In the 19th century, the American world consisted of children and adults.

Most Americans tried their best to allow their children to enjoy their youth while they were slowly prepared for the trials and tribulations of adulthood.

Although the word teenager did not come into use until decades later, the teenage mindset dawned in the 1920s.

Although child labor practices still existed, more and more states were passing restrictions against such exploitation.

The average number of years spent in school for young Americans was also on the rise.

In the 19th century, the American world consisted of children and adults.

Most Americans tried their best to allow their children to enjoy their youth while they were slowly prepared for the trials and tribulations of adulthood.

Boston: New England Foundation for the Humanities, 1994. Women, Health, & Medicine in America: A Historical Handbook. Employs a variety of significant readings and sound historical feminist scholarship. Tells much about practices of the time as well as the power and politics of medical practice. Brought to Bed: Child-bearing in America, 1750-1950. Death in Childbirth: An International Study of Maternal Care and Maternal Mortality, 1800-1950. An academic study stuffed with numbers correlating with issues and causes around maternal mortality. An illustrated account that is sensitive to gender, class, scientific changes, professionalization, and governmental regulation. The Making of Man-Midwifery: Childbirth in England, 1660-1770. A solid, documented historicallook at English male practitioners of midwifery and possible reasons that they eventually superseded female midwives. A Treatise on the Art of Midwifery: Setting Forth Various Abuses Therein, Especially as to the Practice with Instruments. Spares no words against man-midwives and their forceps. An Abridgement of the Practice of Midwifery: and a Set of Anatomical Tables with Explanations. The American version of the large, three-volume series of his lectures published in Britain. Woman as Healer: A Panoramic Survey of the Healing Activities of Women from Prehistoric Times to the Present. Conrad, Lawrence I., Michael Neve, Vivian Nutton, Roy Porter, and Andrew Wear.