Biblical dating records

09-Nov-2019 09:39

But when one begins to work back much prior to the United Kingdom period the picture changes completely.

For example: none of the prominent figures of the Exodus can be positively identified in secular records; the chronology and history of Egypt seem incompatible with the biblical account; the archaeology of Jericho cannot be made to fit the biblical record of Joshua's defeat of that city without sacrificing biblical and scientific integrity; and the situation at Ai is even less workable.

Therefore it is essential that our evaluation of the evidence be accurate and fair.

First, let’s make sure we have a clear picture of the Biblical perspective.

It seems that every year, especially around the spring Passover season when Jews and many Christians commemorate Israel’s deliverance from Egypt, newspapers and magazines publish articles questioning the validity of the Biblical account of the Exodus...

There is no doubt that the central people and places named in the New Testament existed, for example, and a number of Israel's kings are named in the literature of surrounding countries.Perhaps you have read such articles and wondered whether you can believe the Bible.After almost 200 years of archaeological research in Egypt and Israel, why do so many challenge the Exodus account?The stakes are not small, as the critics well know.If the narrative of the Exodus is not factual, then the trustworthiness of Biblical revelation is indeed seriously undermined.

There is no doubt that the central people and places named in the New Testament existed, for example, and a number of Israel's kings are named in the literature of surrounding countries.

Perhaps you have read such articles and wondered whether you can believe the Bible.

After almost 200 years of archaeological research in Egypt and Israel, why do so many challenge the Exodus account?

The stakes are not small, as the critics well know.

If the narrative of the Exodus is not factual, then the trustworthiness of Biblical revelation is indeed seriously undermined.

Yeno’am is made into nonexistence; Israel is wasted, its seed is not.” Ashkelon, Gezer and Yeno’am are followed by an Egyptian hieroglyph that designates a town. Although Biblical scholars and archaeologists argue about various aspects of Israel’s Exodus from Egypt, many of them agree that the Exodus occurred in some form or another. In the 1930s, archaeologists at the University of Chicago were excavating the mortuary Temple of Aya and Horemheb, the last two pharaohs of Egypt’s 18th Dynasty, in western Thebes.